pnBlawg

the professional negligence blog

A collaboration between Rebmark Legal Solutions and 1 Chancery Lane

The Return of the Omni Ombudsman

Our regular readers will recall that we recently blogged about the Legal Ombudsman’s interest in providing redress for clients of non-legal professionals.

This is not the only area where LeO's domain may expand. The Legal Services Consumer Panel reported last year that non-client third parties should have a right of redress from LeO.

The Panel has since looked into the  2,184 complaints from non-clients that LeO turned away last year for want of jurisdiction. Earlier this week the Panel published 39 case studies to illustrate the sorts of complaints that might merit redress by LeO. The case studies include conveyancing horrors, aggressive debt recovery, unpleasant experiences at court and failures to administer estates properly.

A number of the case studies concern situations in which the legal professional would or might owe a duty of care to the complainant. LeO's rules allow for a complaint to be dismissed or discontinued if it would be more suitable for the issue to be dealt with by a court, but the Panel thought that the costs of going to court meant that redress by LeO might be the only realistic prospect of getting justice for some complainants.

As a change to the classes of complainant to LeO requires an order of the Lord Chancellor under the Legal Services Act 2007 it might be sometime before non-clients can obtain redess from LeO. In the meantime the case studies should provide a rich source of inspiration to those setting interview questions, tort examinations and moot problems.

 

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